Reduce Stress with Balance

What can we do when we find ourselves getting overly stressed? The simple answer is simple– stop, look and listen. It doesn’t matter it you are a student struggling to understand a problem, a parent trying to make ends meet or a senior citizen trying to remember where they left their car keys. The answer is always the same–– You need to stop, look and listen.

If you have forgotten how to stop and reflect or no one ever taught you the importance of introspection––the art of connecting deeply with yourself here is a very simple exercise you can do: http://www.innereyepublishing.com/support/labyrinth.html

The labyrinth is one of the basic I Create What I Believe! art activities students are being taught in the classroom and in after school programs. This simple activity can help you relax your body, you focus your mind, and move your whole system out of reactivity and into your conscious problem-solving mind.

Give it a try! Once you learn the activity on paper, you can duplicate the experience with your finger on your leg or arm to help your body regain a calm, clear and centered perspective.

Our body was designed to be balanced, though our culture with all if its striving to dominate perpetuates disconnection and imbalance.  This can leave us feeling powerless or incompetent. Having one simple tool you can use anywhere to help you stop, reflect and uncover a new solution can make a huge difference in the quality of your life and your ability to succeed.

Today’s Pilot Updates

“…I was able to devote the entire class period to ICWIB today.  We began by making a journal for their ICWIB reflections.  Our activity today was circles and lines, this time with objects to draw around and rulers.  Last week was so hurried that I wanted to extend the lesson.

When I was reviewing from last week’s reading of Out of the Box! one girl said “this feels like church.”  I have only presented the material from an art of science perspective so she is obviously experiencing a change.  Another student said, “I messed up” and a classmate said, “You can’t mess up.”  I am really pleased to see they’re getting it!

I saw many variations on my instructions.  Some put lines and circles together even though I asked for one side of each first before combining them.  Some did rubbings.  One scribbled really hard and said “I’m putting my anger on the page.”  I saw all kinds of interesting designs.  Our first journal entry will be Monday to reflect on whether they’re a line person or a circle person and how it feels to draw each…”

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