Category Archives: Transformation

Historically

When I studied art in college I had a wonderful teacher for life drawing who changed the way I drew and changed my life. At the beginning of each class he had us draw on very large tablets of paper because he felt it was a great way to encourage us to bring our whole body, mind, and spirit into the drawing. Each drawing or sketch was timed and the time was shortened with each drawing. The faster we drew, the more we had to bring all of our body, mind, and spirit into the drawing. I can still remember the sweat pouring down my body and the “high” of the energy running through me. I was no longer thinking, looking, measuring, or calculating. I was sensing the model and I was breathing with the model. In the process I became one with the model.

Some of my best drawing “erupted” in that class, but more importantly I learned how to merge with my subject matter and let it speak through me. I think that is the reason I am so addicted to drawing—it shifts brain states and helps me connect more deeply with life.

I still have my teacher in my head guiding me at times to get me out of my thoughts and connect more deeply with my subject. When I can’t hear him or feel his energy guiding me, I turn to the first activity in the ICWIB Program, Just Scribble. Why? Because it pulls me inward, increases my focus, relaxes my body, and silences the chatter in my mind. In the process, I return home to myself, which ultimately is my real goal.

Historically, I have also used the Just Scribble activity to bring forth images for my artwork, crystalize my clarity, and reconnect with myself in a deeper way. If I don’t have crayons and paper with me, I use my finger on my leg or the palm of my hand. In the process I am able to slow down, pull myself inward and focus more deeply. What I am doing is purposely shifting from my reactive mind, which is where our tapes are stored, to my conscious, problem-solving mind.

With this in mind, I invite you to explore some of the ICWIB art activities and videos for FREE.

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If you would like to read previous posts, you can find them under resources.

 

Fear and Deception

In this short video Bruce Lipton talks about how fear is a great motivator and if you can get people to live in fear you can sell them anything. He goes on to explain that when we are in fear, our chemistry changes and our stress hormones change the operation of our brain so we become less intelligent, more open to manipulation, and further disempowerment.

How does this happen?

When we are in fear our stress hormones constrict the blood vessels in our forebrain, which is where conscious reasoning and logical thinking takes place. It then forces the blood to the hindbrain where no thinking takes place and we operate from reactive behavior.

If you find yourself feeling fearful, stressed, or overwhelmed, how can you move back into your forebrain or conscious mind?

The I Create What I Believe! Program, endorsed by Dr. Lipton and based on his research, offers fun and scientifically sound tools to help both children and adults learn how to activate and move back into their conscious mind (forebrain) with activities as simple as scribbling and drawing circles and lines.

Explore and Ponder: Activity Two

Each I Create What I Believe! (ICWIB!) art activity is built upon the previous ones. In the first activity, Just Scribble, which is an introduction to the art of self-reflection, you learn to use the movement of your crayon and your breath to increase your focus, go inward, and observe. In this second activity, Explore and Ponder or the preschool version, Circles and Lines, you learn to uncover how drawing specific-shaped lines and patterns can shift your mind-state quickly and effectively. In the process, you are creating a “tailor-made” set of tools for shifting your mind-states anywhere or any time.

As you explore drawing both circles and lines, pay specific attention to the size, direction drawn, and amount of pressure that gives you the most pleasure, because feeling pleasure and joy are indicators that you have activated your conscious mind (forebrain). When you activate the conscious mind, the feel-good hormone oxytocin and the neurotransmitter dopamine are released into your body and brain.

Once you have uncovered the pattern that gives you the most pleasure, use it as your own personally tailored stress-reducing tool. I also invite you to share this ICWIB! activity with your family, friends, colleagues, and community, because I think everyone—both young and old—could benefit from having their own tailor made stress reduction tools.

Explore the ICWIB! Program further and continue to follow our weekly posts here.  If you enjoy these activities, Like us on Facebook and share in the conversation.  We’d love to hear your feedback—see you there!

Pure Love

I have been told that one should not touch or engage with a service dog when they are working because it can be distracting and stressful for the dog, but in situations like this I break all of the rules.

I was in a store with Alex when this very young child spotted Alex, broke away from his parents and ran as fast as he could towards him with an expression of joy on his face. When he reached Alex he immediately wrapped his arms around Alex’s head and buried his face in Alex’s fur.

In that moment, I could feel Alex soften and let the child fall into him. At the same time, his parents began running towards Alex and their son. When they reached us, they took their child’s hand, apologized, and walked away.

Seconds later, the child ran back to Alex and wrapped his arms around him again. This time Alex became amazingly still. The parents once again took their child by the hand, apologized, and walked away again. When the child broke away and ran towards Alex a third time, I squatted down next to Alex and asked him if this was okay with him. He just leaned against me, smiled, and opened his heart wider.

When the child reached out to hug Alex this time, I handed my cell phone to his mom and asked her to take a picture of them together. Then this tiny child leaned in and kissed Alex.

It is moments like this that my faith in the Universe is restored.

I invite you to explore some of the ICWIB art activities and videos for FREE.

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If you would like to read previous posts, you can find them under resources.

Go To The Trees

I have written many pieces about how we can acquire negative programs in the first six years of life, and how these patterns can make it difficult to realize our dreams and thrive. I think it is also important to remember that most of us have also acquired some good patterns. (I don’t think we would be here today it we didn’t.)

I personally acquired a lot of negative programs when I was young, but at the same time I am very grateful for the good programs I acquired even if some of them were the result of very difficult situations. One of the patterns I acquired when I was young was what I call “Go to the Trees!”

So how did I acquire this pattern and how do I consciously use it in my life now?

When I was about five, my mother, father, older sister, and I moved from our flat in the city to a house on some land outside the city. There was seasonal creek running through the middle of the property with the house sitting on one side of the creek and woods on the other.

Whenever I got in trouble, which was often, I would leave the house, cross the bridge over the creek and go into the woods. It felt quiet, calm, and safe in the woods and being there helped me unravel my confusion and reconnect with myself. Sometimes I would hold onto a tree while I cried or talked myself through my current problem. Other times I would just stroll through the trees or play with a stick until I felt ready to go back to the house.

To this day, whenever my stress level rises to a certain level, I get a feeling deep within my bones that lets me know that I need to just drop everything and “go to the trees.” When I do, the quiet calm generated by the trees helps me reconnect more deeply with myself.

With this in mind, I recommend you take some time to walk back in time and explore how you responded to difficult situations as a child, and in the process you might uncover some good programs you created to survive those difficult moments. Life will never be devoid of challenges, but if you remember your good programs they can provide you with inner strength to change negative beliefs that are hindering your ability to thrive.

With this in mind, I invite you to explore some of the ICWIB art activities and videos for FREE, because they are another way reconnect with yourself more deeply and gain the inner strength to change negative beliefs that are hindering your ability to thrive.

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If you would like to read previous posts, you can find them under resources.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Any Surface

I had known for a long time that I felt better whenever I was drawing, painting, or sculpting, but I didn’t really understand why until I met Dr. Bruce Lipton in 1989. It was at that first meeting where he explained to me that our mind actually consists of two minds—the subconscious and the conscious mind. They were designed to work together in tandem, but they are very different.

The subconscious or reactive mind is stronger, bigger, and a million times faster than the conscious mind. On the other hand, the conscious mind has the capacity to rewrite beliefs and perceptions we acquired in our early childhood that hinder our ability to succeed.

The creative process requires the conscious mind. Since the two-mind team—subconscious and conscious—operates in an “either-or” system, when you activate your conscious mind you also suspend the subconscious mind. This means you are also suspending preprogrammed beliefs and perceptions, which creates an opportunity for you to identify an inaccurate belief, change it, and create a more effective response.

With this in mind, any time I need to activate my conscious mind and I don’t have paper, canvas, or clay, I will use any surface available to me to shift myself from my reactive mind to my conscious mind so I can continue to create a more authentic and joyous life.

I invite you to explore some of the ICWIB! art activities and videos for FREE because they are a simple and effective way to activate your conscious problem-solving mind.

If you enjoy these messages, Like us on Facebook and share it with others to enjoy.

If you would like to read previous posts, you can find them under resources.

 

I Am My Own Big Dog

When I was young I wanted a big dog with soft fur and a heart of gold. He also needed to be a noble being that helped me feel safe.

My mother said dogs cost too much money and my father said they were too much work, but my grandfather, the owner of many dogs, took an interest in my dream dog and asked me lots of questions whenever we spent time together.

Would your dog protect you, love you, and find you if you were lost? How could a dog help you take care of and be true to yourself? Would your dog have to work on the farm like Jake or would taking care of you be his only job? Each time, his questions encouraged me to go inside and find an answer.

Over time I began to realize that I needed someone to be there for me, listen to me when I was upset, and to love me even if I had done something they didn’t like. I don’t remember how many times we talked about my dream dog, but I do remember the day I realized I could be my own big dog. I realized I could love, protect, and find myself when I felt lost, and when I did this, I felt happy and alive. So with some help from my grandfather, I became my own big dog.

The ICWIB activities are another way to go inward and find your own big dog.

With this in mind, I invite you to explore some of the ICWIB art activities and videos for FREE.

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If you would like to read previous posts, you can find them under resources.

 

We Were Born

We weren’t designed to be merely linear beings. We are a blend of body, mind, and spirit and were born to be connected to all living things. Unfortunately, our lives today don’t always support this union. Consequently many people spend much of their lives disconnected from their spirits and walk through life as distant and isolated observers. This is very sad, for when you disconnect in this manner you can lose touch with your authentic nature and what is really important.

I know no greater feeling than the bliss of knowing who you are and that you truly belong. A union and connection of this magnitude can give you the energy and confidence you need to pursue your dreams. But without this connection to your spirit it is difficult to be fully alive and make your dreams a reality.

So how can you know when you are disconnected from your spirit? If you have lost your hope or your direction, then you probably have lost your connection with your spirit. If you have lost your ability to love and be loved, or just being alive doesn’t make you happy, then you most likely have lost connection to your spirit.

When this happens I think it is time to go inward and reconnect with your authentic nature. You can accomplish this many ways. When my children were young and I had very little time for myself, I would use my daily chores and breathing techniques to slow myself down so I could reconnect with myself and remember what was important to me. As my children got older I was able to return to my pen and pencil and also model for them how to use scribbling and drawing to reconnect with themselves in a deeper way.

With this in mind, I invite you to explore some of the ICWIB art activities and videos for FREE.

If you enjoy these messages, Like us on Facebook and share it with others to enjoy.

If you would like to read previous posts, you can find them under resources.

 

Thrive

When life doesn’t play out the way we want, we can try and change others or we can learn how to go inward, identify what we need to change, and then change it. The first action of trying change a situation by changing others never really works and tends to be disempowering for all concerned. On the other hand, learning how to go inside and change an inaccurate belief or perception can have a profound impact on a situation and is an act of self-empowerment.

When Dr. Bruce Lipton said, “When you change a belief, you can change your whole life,” this is what he was talking about. So whenever you find yourself wrestling with a challenge, instead of fixating on what others need to change, step back, go inward and discover what you need to change and then change it. Responding to a challenge in this way can have a profound impact on your whole life.

I invite you to explore some of the ICWIB art activities and videos for FREE because they are a simple and effective way to help you learn how to go inward, change a belief or perception, and ultimately change your whole life.

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If you would like to read previous posts, you can find them under resources.

Children See


Children see—even if they don’t have the capacity to articulate what they see—they see and their mind records what they see. This can be a good thing or a bad thing depending on the situation and how you respond.

Many, many years ago when my son was about three-and-a-half, I went on an errand that I thought would take about 15 to 20 minutes, with the intent that afterward we would go to the park and play. Unfortunately, it didn’t turn out that way. I thought all I had to do was walk into the stationery store, pick up a job from the printer, pay for it, and leave. When we arrived, we were told to would take just a little more time. Well, that little more time stretched into 45 minutes.

I kept offering to come back later, but they kept saying it would only take a few more minutes. In the process, I found myself getting increasingly frustrated and angry. In hopes of reducing some of the stress I finally took my son by the hand and walked the isles in hopes of finding some pens and paper I could buy him so we would have something to play with while we were waiting.

We had just found the pens and paper when the owner came out and announced that the job would not be done until the next day, so I purchased the pens and paper, left the store and headed to the park.

In the back seat of the car on the way to the park, my son drew the above portrait of me.

When got to the park, he showed me his picture. I was stunned! In that moment, even though it was embarrassing to have been captured so accurately I said, “Wow! That is amazing! I was really angry. I was really frustrated!” He smiled and said, “Yes!” Then he jumped out of the car and said, “Lets go down the slide,”

I have held on to that picture for several decades in hopes of reminding myself to be more conscious of my beliefs, perceptions, and actions, because children are observing, and it is impacting them all of the time even if they don’t have the capacity to articulate what they see.

I have found that the ICWIB activities not only help me reduce stress and release bottled-up emotions, but that they also help me see more clearly, which ultimately helps me to not take on inaccurate beliefs, and to transform the ones I have already taken on.

With this in mind, I invite you to explore some of the ICWIB art activities and videos for FREE.

If you enjoy these messages, Like us on Facebook and share it with others to enjoy.

If you would like to read previous posts, you can find them under resources.

 

 

Not a Waste of Time

A Drexel University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania study found that coloring, drawing, and doodling make us feel more relaxed because they activate the prefrontal cortex, which helps control the brain’s reward pathways and contributes to our emotions, decision-making capabilities, and motivation.

In this study, the participants were given paper and markers and instructed to doodle in several different ways. They found that during each of the activities—in just three minutes’ time—blood flow increased in the prefrontal cortex of the brain.

After the final activity was complete, the subjects were asked to report their state of mind, both in regard to their drawing activities and how they were feeling about themselves. The responses were overwhelmingly positive, suggesting that time spent drawing, doodling, or coloring is not a waste.

With this in mind, I invite you to explore some of the ICWIB art activities and videos for FREE.

If you enjoy these messages, Like us on Facebook and share it with others to enjoy.

 If you would like to read previous posts, you can find them under resources.