Category Archives: Facebook

Thrive

When life doesn’t play out the way we want, we can try and change others or we can learn how to go inward, identify what we need to change, and then change it. The first action of trying change a situation by changing others never really works and tends to be disempowering for all concerned. On the other hand, learning how to go inside and change an inaccurate belief or perception can have a profound impact on a situation and is an act of self-empowerment.

When Dr. Bruce Lipton said, “When you change a belief, you can change your whole life,” this is what he was talking about. So whenever you find yourself wrestling with a challenge, instead of fixating on what others need to change, step back, go inward and discover what you need to change and then change it. Responding to a challenge in this way can have a profound impact on your whole life.

I invite you to explore some of the ICWIB art activities and videos for FREE because they are a simple and effective way to help you learn how to go inward, change a belief or perception, and ultimately change your whole life.

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If you would like to read previous posts, you can find them under resources.

Children See


Children see—even if they don’t have the capacity to articulate what they see—they see and their mind records what they see. This can be a good thing or a bad thing depending on the situation and how you respond.

Many, many years ago when my son was about three-and-a-half, I went on an errand that I thought would take about 15 to 20 minutes, with the intent that afterward we would go to the park and play. Unfortunately, it didn’t turn out that way. I thought all I had to do was walk into the stationery store, pick up a job from the printer, pay for it, and leave. When we arrived, we were told to would take just a little more time. Well, that little more time stretched into 45 minutes.

I kept offering to come back later, but they kept saying it would only take a few more minutes. In the process, I found myself getting increasingly frustrated and angry. In hopes of reducing some of the stress I finally took my son by the hand and walked the isles in hopes of finding some pens and paper I could buy him so we would have something to play with while we were waiting.

We had just found the pens and paper when the owner came out and announced that the job would not be done until the next day, so I purchased the pens and paper, left the store and headed to the park.

In the back seat of the car on the way to the park, my son drew the above portrait of me.

When got to the park, he showed me his picture. I was stunned! In that moment, even though it was embarrassing to have been captured so accurately I said, “Wow! That is amazing! I was really angry. I was really frustrated!” He smiled and said, “Yes!” Then he jumped out of the car and said, “Lets go down the slide,”

I have held on to that picture for several decades in hopes of reminding myself to be more conscious of my beliefs, perceptions, and actions, because children are observing, and it is impacting them all of the time even if they don’t have the capacity to articulate what they see.

I have found that the ICWIB activities not only help me reduce stress and release bottled-up emotions, but that they also help me see more clearly, which ultimately helps me to not take on inaccurate beliefs, and to transform the ones I have already taken on.

With this in mind, I invite you to explore some of the ICWIB art activities and videos for FREE.

If you enjoy these messages, Like us on Facebook and share it with others to enjoy.

If you would like to read previous posts, you can find them under resources.

 

 

Not a Waste of Time

A Drexel University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania study found that coloring, drawing, and doodling make us feel more relaxed because they activate the prefrontal cortex, which helps control the brain’s reward pathways and contributes to our emotions, decision-making capabilities, and motivation.

In this study, the participants were given paper and markers and instructed to doodle in several different ways. They found that during each of the activities—in just three minutes’ time—blood flow increased in the prefrontal cortex of the brain.

After the final activity was complete, the subjects were asked to report their state of mind, both in regard to their drawing activities and how they were feeling about themselves. The responses were overwhelmingly positive, suggesting that time spent drawing, doodling, or coloring is not a waste.

With this in mind, I invite you to explore some of the ICWIB art activities and videos for FREE.

If you enjoy these messages, Like us on Facebook and share it with others to enjoy.

 If you would like to read previous posts, you can find them under resources.

 

 

Who Would You Be Without Your Story?

A friend just sent me something that contained the following question, “Who would you be without your story?” The question caught my eye and intrigued me enough that I began pondering the question.

What if I had been born a man instead of a woman? What if I was tall instead of short? What if I had become a doctor instead of an artist? A linear thinker not a visual learner? What if I had grown-up with brothers instead of sisters? Or grown up a different race or in a different country? Would I have the same honor code? Would I have the same integrity line? Would I still feel that being centered, clear, and accountable was mandatory? The more questions I asked myself, the more intrigued I became with the idea of “Who am I without the story my family, friends, and I have woven?”

After several days of pondering, I finally came up with an answer—I would be the part of me that I refer to as my authentic self. Yes! I would still have the same honor code and integrity line. I would still feel it was important to walk through life as centered and as clear as possible. I would still feel it is important to be accountable for all of my actions and make restitution. I would still believe that everyone is good, has profound gifts to share with the world, and is capable of fulfilling his or her potential.

The funny twist to my story is that at one point early in my art career—when I was in my twenties—I signed my work “Just Me.” Now I am working on being Just Me.

If you would like to ponder the question: Who would I be without my story, I invite you to explore some of the ICWIB! art activities and videos for FREE, because they are a wonderful way to shift mind states and spiral into your authentic nature.

If you do explore the question: Who would I be without my story? I invite you also to share some of your findings with the ICWIB! community.

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If you would like to read previous posts, you can find them under resources.

 

Bite Yourself in the Butt


Have you ever said or did something that later came back to bite you in the butt? I know I have. When I was younger I tried to sweep those moments under the rug or downplay them because not being perfect and being caught in the act of not being perfect was too embarrassing. Now in my less-than-glorious moments, I try to not run, hide, or sweep the event under the rug. Instead, I try to stop, look inside, and discover the root or underlying belief or perception behind my behavior, and then change that. This is not a chastising moment, but rather one of peaceful and loving acceptance of myself.

How does stopping and going inside help me discover the underlying cause or belief? Slowing down and observing each step helps me to shift from my reactive, unconscious mind to my conscious, creative problem-solving mind. In the process, I gain the ability to see the cause of my problem, and also create a new and more appropriate response. This is what Dr. Bruce Lipton is talking about when he said, “…When you change a belief or perception you can change your whole life…”

I often turn to the simple ICWIB art activities, which require no artistic training or skill because they are a fun and easy way to discover the underlying belief or perception behind behavior, and then change it.

With this in mind, I invite you to explore some of the ICWIB art activities and videos for FREE.

If you enjoy these messages, Like us on Facebook and share it with others to enjoy.

If you would like to read previous posts, you can find them under resources.

Epigenetics 101

Even today, medical students and practitioners are operating under the assumption that genes are the primary factors in biological processes and that we are essentially all just victims of our heredity. To put it simply, modern science has mistaken the blueprint, in this case the DNA, for the contractor who actually builds the house.

The revolutionary science of Dr. Bruce Lipton proved that it’s actually the cell membrane, which is covered in hundreds of thousands of receptor proteins, that is specialized to interpret different signals from the environment and relay the information back to the cells. Epigenetics has scientifically proven that evolution is no longer a mindless game of chance based on random hereditary variance, rather it is an interactive dance between organism and environment.

Since we now know that evolution is not a mindless game of chance, but rather this interaction, how can we actively transform any negative programs we have and also help our children transform any negative programs they might have already acquired?

I Create What I Believe! Program, endorsed by Dr. Bruce Lipton and based on his research, offers fun and scientifically sound activities that teach both children and adults how to transform negative programs quickly and effortlessly. 

Read more… →

Why Do I Draw?

When I studied art many years ago, I was taught to draw and create beautiful things for others. The process was about pleasing and recognition—not transformation. I struggled with that approach because it placed me outside of myself and left me feeling off balanced, unsure of myself, and discontent. Then one day I came to the conclusion that I needed to draw and create for my own wellbeing and if what I created delighted and served someone else that was good, but it shouldn’t be my primary focus.

With that in mind, my artwork began to take on a specific theme or direction, and it became, and still is, about quieting myself and reconnecting deeply with life and my authentic self. So now I draw because the act of drawing pulls me into myself, helps me to become more present, and it delights my soul. I draw because drawing activates my conscious mind and in the process I am able to see more clearly, transform beliefs that are hindering my ability to thrive, and in the process I remember who I am. I stop trying to be someone I am not.

I created the I Create What I Believe! (ICWIB!) Program so others won’t have to devote over forty-five years of their life to drawing to reap the benefits of the pencil or crayon. The process is simple, because I have extracted the need for technical skill or mastery and in its place have given you an opportunity to journey back to yourself in a simple, fun, and delightful manner.

With this in mind, I invite you to explore some of the ICWIB art activities and videos for FREE.

If you enjoy these messages, Like us on Facebook and share it with others to enjoy

If you would like to read previous posts, you can find them under resources.

The Chain of Harm

When we are young, our minds are predominantly in a theta brain state—copy and paste. This allows us to learn an immense amount of information quickly as we adapt to new environments. Unfortunately, we don’t have the capacity to question the appropriateness of what we are learning during these early and formative years. This means we can take on beliefs, perceptions, and behaviors that are ineffective and produce unwanted results.

My mother was an extremely reactionary and destructive person, even though in her true nature she had a heart of gold. When she was stressed she would blame and attack others—saying and doing very harmful things. As a young child, I became very fearful of others, and also acquired the same knee-jerk response pattern. When I became aware of this pattern and the negative impact it was having on my life, I began to watch and observe myself in stressful situations. I came to understand that if I could remain calm and centered in a triggering situation, I also had the capacity to respond differently and create a new pattern for future interaction, as well.

While process was uncomfortable in the beginning, over time I was able to let go of the learned behavior with the simple act of being conscious and present in the moment. By remembering that her behavior was unconscious and learned from others helped me be more compassionate, and not take her behavior so personally. In retrospect, I can see that accomplishing these small steps helped me to break the chain of harm.

The ICWIB activities are a great way to gain a deeper sense of self and change ineffective patterns and behavior.

I invite you to explore some of the ICWIB art activities and videos for FREE.

If you enjoy these messages, Like us on Facebook.

If you would like to read previous posts, you can find them under resources.

 

 

The Programmable Mind

At UPLIFT Festival 2014, Dr. Bruce Lipton shared how “your life is not coming from your conscious wishes and desires, your life is coming from your program.” He stated the function of the mind is to create coherence between beliefs and reality and simply put quoting Henry Ford, “If you believe you can, or you believe you can’t—you’re right.”

Dr. Lipton explained that scientific research shows we are only truly conscious 5% of the day, meaning only 5% of the day comes from our creative wishes, desires, and aspirations. The other 95% of the time we operate on autopilot with the default program that resides in our subconscious mind. The problem with this equation is that the majority of the programs that reside in the subconscious mind are negative, limiting, and disempowering, and stress triggers this part of the mind to take over and run your whole system.

So how can we shed our negative programming and create more from our wishes and desires when we live in a high stressed culture?

The I Create What I Believe! Program, endorsed by Dr. Lipton and based on his research, offers fun and scientifically sound tools to help both children and adults learn how to change their negative programming with activities as simple as scribbling and drawing circles and lines.

Explore and Ponder: Activity Two

Each I Create What I Believe! (ICWIB!) art activity is built upon the previous ones. In the first activity, Just Scribble, which is an introduction to the art of self-reflection, you learn to use the movement of your crayon and your breath to increase your focus, go inward, and observe. In this second activity, Explore and Ponder or the preschool version, Circles and Lines, you learn to uncover how drawing specific-shaped lines and patterns can instantly shift-mind states for you. In the process, you are also able to create a “tailor made” set of tools for shifting your mind states anywhere or any time. This means you won’t have to be a victim of your programming anymore!

In the programmable mind video above, Dr. Bruce Lipton says, “…The way to create peace is to help our children not acquire negative programming.” I would like to add, “…and provide them, their parents, and teachers with tools so they can all release any negative programming they have already acquired.”

How could doing the ICWIB! activities help bring about peace? When you shift from your reactive mind to your conscious mind your heart opens, your mind becomes clearer, and you experience an inner peacefulness. This in turn shifts your perceptions and allows you to move through life in a more open-hearted and compassionate way, instead of responding from your negative programs.

So with this in mind, I invite you to collectively join together and learn, practice, and share the ICWIB! activities with your family, friends, colleagues, and community, and when you do, please share your stories with all of us on our ICWIB! Facebook page.

Explore the ICWIB! Program further and continue to follow our weekly posts here.  If you enjoy these activities, Like us on Facebook and share in the conversation.  We’d love to hear your feedback—see you there!

Cause and Effect

One of the stumbling blocks I encountered with my first child was how to deal with toys not being picked up and put away. I knew I didn’t want to nag or yell, but being a new parent I didn’t know how to recruit my daughter’s cooperation in a consistent and effective way. I was fortunate that she had several wonderful preschool teachers who offered me guidance along the way.

I can still remember sitting in one of the tiny chairs talking to her teacher one day after school about the perpetual problem of toys on the floor. As I described the situation I can still remember this sweet, warm, and knowing smile spread across her face as she said one word, “consequences.” Children learn best through consequences or cause and effect. If she leaves something on the floor and it gets stepped on or broken, she will learn through the consequence. It doesn’t matter how many times you tell her something, it won’t be as an effective teacher as a consequence.

This was a hard lesson for me to execute in the beginning because like many first-time moms, I wanted to spare her from pain. Over time, however, I saw that consequence was a great teacher not only for her but for me as well. So now when my life if not playing out the way I would prefer it did, I ask myself “How is this event connected to a previous choice I made”? “What belief do I need to change”? and “What am I trying to learn”? Once I know the answers to these questions, I am able to change my thinking and create a new response.

I historically have used the Just Scribble activity in the ICWIB! Program to explore these questions. With this in mind, I invite you to explore some of the ICWIB! art activities and videos for FREE.

If you enjoy these messages, Like us on Facebook and share it with others to enjoy.

If you would like to read previous posts, you can find them under resources.